Did You Know?

Most study participants reported limited education

April 6, 2020

More than half of participants in the BC Healthy Connections Project (BCHCP) reported having a limited education, meaning they had not completed high school or the equivalent. For those age 14–19 years, 69% had not completed high school; for those age 20–24 years, 38% had not completed this milestone. By comparison, approximately 11% of BC girls and young women in the general population (under age 25) typically do not complete high school.

 

 


World Autism Awareness Day takes place this week

March 30, 2020

Thursday, April 2, 2019 marks the twelfth annual World Autism Awareness Day. Hundreds of thousands of landmarks, buildings, homes and communities around the world will shine with blue light in recognition of people living with autism.

A qualitative study by the Children’s Health Policy Centre, published in 2015 in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders described the challenges facing both parents and policymakers with respect to autism. The findings suggested that there is an emerging consensus on improving autism services in Canada—which should greatly benefit children. Read the paper here.

 


Address substance use & parenting, together

March 23, 2020

Roughly one in 10 Canadian children live with a parent who struggles with problematic substance use. Practitioners can help these families by addressing both substance use and parenting. For example, parent-focused programs can lead to children having significantly fewer alcohol or cannabis problems many years after their parents complete treatment. For more information, see Vol. 8, No. 1 of the Children’s Mental Health Research Quarterly.

 

 


NFP is being tested around the world

March 16, 2020

While Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) has proven highly successful in the US, every country is different. So now, other countries around the world are evaluating the program to see how well it works in their jurisdictions, too. In addition to Canada, these other countries include the Netherlands and England, who have both completed studies, while Norway and Australia are currently exploring the program’s feasibility. The English trial had negative findings, although the trial in the Netherlands was positive — underscoring the importance of completing the BC trial to learn how to really benefit children and mothers here.

 


Kinship care aids children

March 8, 2020

When children cannot live with their parents, the option of living with family — or kinship care — should be explored. Compared to typical foster care, kinship care can lead to improved child well-being, fewer childhood mental disorders and fewer placement changes. For more information, see Vol. 8, No. 3 of the Children’s Mental Health Research Quarterly.


Public health nurses key to Nurse-Family Partnership

March 2, 2020

Public health nurses receive intensive education before delivering Nurse-Family Partnership — so they can bring strong skills to the program and also tailor it to the individual to build rapport. For example, nurses meet in the settings of the mother’s own choosing — her home or another place that feels safe for her. Choices like this allow the mother to experience greater convenience — and to develop trust and a close relationship with the nurse.


Schools can succeed in reducing bullying

February 24, 2020

Feb. 27/20 marks National Anti-Bullying day in which all people are asked to stand up to this serious health risk that arises out of an imbalance in power. Bullying can be prevented, and adults can help. For example, children experience less victimization at schools where teachers send strong anti-bullying messages. In contrast, children experience more victimization at schools with high conflict and limited supervision. So, schools can take concrete steps to keep children safe. For more information, see Vol. 2, No. 4 of the Children’s Mental Health Research Quarterly.

 


Prevention program may pay for itself

February 17, 2020

American cost analyses have suggested that Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) may pay for itself over the long term— even after nursing costs are factored in — based on calculations showing that NFP families used fewer added services across multiple sectors, including healthcare, child protection, special education, justice and income assistance. While estimates will differ country-to-country, these US figures nevertheless suggest there may be “savings” of two to six dollars for every NFP dollar spent over 10 to 15 years — suggesting the program may pay for itself.


trauma

CBT is effective for trauma

February 10, 2020

Many forms of childhood adversity are avoidable. Preventing exposure to adversity is therefore always the main goal. But when prevention is not possible, effective treatments are critical. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy is the most successful intervention when children have been maltreated or have been exposed to community violence. For more information, see Vol. 5, No. 3 of the Children’s Mental Health Research Quarterly.


enroll in nfp

How can someone enroll in Nurse-Family Partnership

February 3, 2020

Nurse-Family Partnership is now being delivered in more than 60 communities as an enhanced public health service across four regional BC Health Authorities — an example of providing services proportionate to need. Girls and young women who are early in pregnancy and wish to enroll can contact:
• Fraser Health — Best Beginnings Program. Toll-free: 1-877-820-7444
• Vancouver Coastal Health — Public Health Prenatal Program. Toll-free: 1-855-550-2229
• Island Health — Right From the Start Program. Toll-free: 1-877-370-8699
• Interior Health — Healthy From the Start Program. Toll-free: 1-855-868-7710

Primary care practitioners are also welcome to contact these Health Authority programs to make referrals.