Did You Know?

World Autism Awareness Day takes place this week

March 30, 2020

Thursday, April 2, 2019 marks the twelfth annual World Autism Awareness Day. Hundreds of thousands of landmarks, buildings, homes and communities around the world will shine with blue light in recognition of people living with autism.

A qualitative study by the Children’s Health Policy Centre, published in 2015 in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders described the challenges facing both parents and policymakers with respect to autism. The findings suggested that there is an emerging consensus on improving autism services in Canada—which should greatly benefit children. Read the paper here.

 


Address substance use & parenting, together

March 23, 2020

Roughly one in 10 Canadian children live with a parent who struggles with problematic substance use. Practitioners can help these families by addressing both substance use and parenting. For example, parent-focused programs can lead to children having significantly fewer alcohol or cannabis problems many years after their parents complete treatment. For more information, see Vol. 8, No. 1 of the Children’s Mental Health Research Quarterly.

 

 


NFP is being tested around the world

March 16, 2020

While Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP) has proven highly successful in the US, every country is different. So now, other countries around the world are evaluating the program to see how well it works in their jurisdictions, too. In addition to Canada, these other countries include the Netherlands and England, who have both completed studies, while Norway and Australia are currently exploring the program’s feasibility. The English trial had negative findings, although the trial in the Netherlands was positive — underscoring the importance of completing the BC trial to learn how to really benefit children and mothers here.

 


Kinship care aids children

March 8, 2020

When children cannot live with their parents, the option of living with family — or kinship care — should be explored. Compared to typical foster care, kinship care can lead to improved child well-being, fewer childhood mental disorders and fewer placement changes. For more information, see Vol. 8, No. 3 of the Children’s Mental Health Research Quarterly.


Public health nurses key to Nurse-Family Partnership

March 2, 2020

Public health nurses receive intensive education before delivering Nurse-Family Partnership — so they can bring strong skills to the program and also tailor it to the individual to build rapport. For example, nurses meet in the settings of the mother’s own choosing — her home or another place that feels safe for her. Choices like this allow the mother to experience greater convenience — and to develop trust and a close relationship with the nurse.


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